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Everything you need to know about solar-powered air conditioners

At HVAC.com, our writers create solutions that put you in control of your HVAC system. Our product reviews and recommendations are researched and backed by real buyers and industry experts, not dictated by our partners.

Solar-powered air conditioners just make sense. After all, you’re most likely to use your AC when the sun is beating down on your home.

This piece will review the need for solar-powered air conditioning, how solar ACs work, and how much you can expect to save on utilities.

The benefits of solar-powered air conditioning

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, three-quarters of American homes have air conditioners. The energy used by power plants to support that many air conditioners produces 117 million metric tons of carbon dioxide annually. 

Carbon dioxide is considered a greenhouse gas. Greenhouse gasses contribute to global warming and cause environmental and human health issues. 

Additionally, air conditioners account for about 6% of the energy consumed in the U.S. Across the country, Americans spend a cumulative $29 billion on AC-related electricity annually.

Not only can solar-powered air conditioners reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but they can also help slash utility bills. 

And solar AC owners won’t have to worry when utilities employ rolling blackouts on the hottest days to avoid grid overuse. Their ACs work independently of the power company. 

Connect me with an HVAC pro to talk about solar.

How does a solar air conditioner work?

In simple terms, solar ACs use solar panels to power the air conditioning system.

Solar panels collect energy from the sun. They convert this energy into power. That power either goes directly to the air conditioner or to a battery where it’s stored until the AC needs it.

Most solar AC systems are hybrid, meaning they use traditional electricity sources in addition to solar power. Hybrid systems are more popular in very hot environments where it’s necessary to run the AC at night (when there’s no sun) to keep comfortable.

For complete off-the-grid air conditioning, there are solar-only systems. These are more energy-efficient but don’t offer the same flexibility as hybrid systems. 

installing solar AC panels

Solar-powered central air vs. mini splits

Though solar-powered central air conditioners exist, most solar ACs are mini splits. Mini splits differ from central ACs because they don’t require ductwork to operate.

Traditional central ACs consist of an outdoor compressor that pushes air through evaporator and condenser coils to cool it. The equipment distributes that air through your ductwork to the vents throughout your home. A thermostat controls the temperature and function of the entire system.

Mini splits consist of an outdoor compressor and one or more indoor evaporators. The compressor and evaporators connect via electrical and refrigerant lines. Each evaporator has its own thermostat and works independently to cool a zone of your home.

Mini splits are generally more energy-efficient than central air conditioners. They’re less expensive and simpler to install. Popular in Europe and other areas of the world, mini splits are gaining popularity in the U.S.

How many solar panels to run an air conditioner?

The number of panels required to run a solar AC varies. It depends on the solar-powered air conditioner you choose and how much you use it.

Most mini splits use 500-700 watts per hour per evaporator zone. Most residential solar panels make 250-400 watts per hour. That means most solar air conditioners require at least two solar panels.

Central air conditioning capacity is measured based on tonnage. For every 600 square feet, you’ll need 1 ton to keep it cool. So, a 2,000-square-foot home requires at least a 3.5-ton AC. We recommend 1,200 watts of solar paneling for each ton. A 2,000-square-foot home would need 11-17 solar panels. 

Solar-powered mini split

Size of system Number of solar panels
Single zone 2
Two zones 4
Three zones 6
Four zones 8

Solar-powered central air conditioner

Size of space Number of solar panels
1,000 square feet 6-10
1,500 square feet 8-12
2,000 square feet 11-17
2,500 square feet 14-22
3,000 square feet 15-24
3,500 square feet 18-29

How effective is solar air conditioning?

Solar air conditioners are as effective as their traditional counterparts. They will keep you just as cool and comfortable.

Hybrid systems utilize electricity when your solar battery drains, so you don’t have to worry about cloudy days or running the AC at night.

However, some solar-only ACs may not be able to maintain output without the sun’s rays.

Solar air conditioner savings

Solar air conditioners usually cost more than traditional cooling systems. But the upfront expense is worth it to many because of the monthly energy savings. We found that the investment in a solar AC generally pays for itself within 10 years of purchase.

Angi reports the average homeowner spends $3,400 on a solar air conditioner. In general, they cost $1,600-13,000. Mini splits are more affordable, while solar-powered central air conditioners cost more. 

In addition to the cost of the unit, you’ll need to pay for installation. Angi says this ranges $1,500-3,500. 

Alternatively, a traditional air conditioner costs an average of $5,650 with an installation cost of $500-2,500, according to HomeAdvisor. A ductless mini split costs an average of $3,400-4,800 for a single-zone system, with installation fees of $300-1,500.

Switching to a solar-powered air conditioner can reduce your energy bills by 40 percent. The average U.S. homeowner spends $115 per month on electricity. You could save about $46 a month by switching to a solar-powered home air conditioner. 

☀️ I want solar AC! ☀️

Solar savings programs

Beyond the monthly utility savings, there are local and federal incentives that offer credits for using solar energy.

For example, a solar air conditioner purchased in 2022 could be eligible for a 22 percent tax credit with the Federal Solar Investment program. The Energy Star program also offers rebates of up to several hundred dollars for energy-efficient HVAC equipment. 

Best solar-powered ACs

Most big-name HVAC brands aren’t making solar products yet. Lennox’s SunSource line is the only one we’re currently aware of. With Lennox’s reputation for cutting-edge technology, we’re not surprised they’re at the forefront of solar AC. 

HotSpot Energy makes solar-powered HVAC systems that are worth checking out. The brand hasn’t been around for long, but it’s Better Business Bureau accredited with an A+ rating.

Other solar AC manufacturers include Carisol and GREE. However, their presence in the U.S. is minimal at present. As such, we’re unsure what level of installation and repair support they offer to U.S. customers. We’d hold off on purchasing these brands for now.

Still thinking about a solar-powered air conditioner? Connect with one of our HVAC experts to discuss the best deals in your area. 

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What is Limescale and how to remove and prevent it.

Limescale: The (sometimes) hidden efficiency killer. 

Limescale (aka scale, lime) deposits don’t just impact your small home appliances, showers, and bathtub. The damaging effects of limescale deposits in industrial equipment cost industrial and commercial buildings billions of dollars a year due to increased downtime and additional maintenance, which results in reduced efficiencies and ultimately drives up operating expenses.

As limescale builds up in heat exchangers, evaporative coolers, boilers, chillers, and other water-fed equipment, it forces equipment to work harder to get the job done. Over time, limescale coatings also cause corrosion that eats away at pipes and equipment, making conditions ripe for leaks and other damages.

Building operations, plant, and facilities managers should descale equipment regularly, safely, and effectively to prevent system damage and keep facility costs in check.

What is Limescale?

The minerals that cause limescale are always present in your water supply. Limescale, also known as calcium carbonate (CaC03), is a hard, chalky white deposit that gets left behind on surfaces when hard water evaporates. However, this condition afflicts more than tap water—even soft water can form calcium carbonate deposits when highly concentrated.

Limescale deposits build up in facility plumbing systems, heat exchangers, evaporative coolers, boilers, and chillers and are difficult to remove. When allowed to build up, the chalky deposits reduce water flow, destroy equipment efficiency, and can cause equipment to consume more energy.

What Causes Limescale?

Limescale deposits happen as hard water contacts solid surfaces. Mineral scale deposits occur from heat transfer or pressure changes.

Hard water is water with high mineral content. It forms when water percolates through deposits of limestone, chalk, or gypsum, minerals comprised mainly of calcium and magnesium carbonates, soluble calcium bicarbonates, and sulfates.

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimates that around 85% of the U.S. has moderate to very hard water. Humans can drink hard water, but it can damage plumbing systems and mechanical equipment.

The dissolved Co2 and HC03 ions in water form a compound of calcium and magnesium carbonate ions. This chalky residue builds over time, leaving limescale stains and buildup behind. The more layers that build, the more it can damage equipment function, longevity, and appearance.

Water temperature matters too. Limescale loves hot water. The hotter the water, the quicker limescale builds up. However, chilled water can experience scale buildup as well.

Is Limescale Harmful?

Limescale buildup can cause considerable damage within water-cooled or heated equipment.

It can make plumbing fixtures appear dirty, especially in restrooms where it builds up in toilets, sinks, and showerheads, giving bathrooms used by building occupants and the public a dingy and cloudy appearance.

Limescale builds layers in pipework, where the scale reduces water flow area and increases pipe wall friction. This can result in buildings requiring a larger, energy-hungry pump to maintain throughput volumes. But powerful pumps represent a temporary solution. Eventually, the pipework will need cleaning. In the meantime, the building may experience leaks, increased operational noise, and boosted energy consumption.

One-quarter inch of limescale buildup on a heat exchange surface reduces heat transfer and can increase energy use by up to 40%. Here, facility and plant managers may need to install expensive, heavy-duty heat exchangers to compensate. Scaled boiler tubes also may overheat and fail. Cooling towers can collapse from heavy-scale deposits. Worse, limescale build can potentially shorten equipment lifespans and lead to unplanned shutdowns, costing a significant amount of money.

Also, limescale buildup can corrode steel surfaces, leading to fluid leaks and equipment failure, which is costly and dangerous. Fouled safety valves or emergency process sensors may fail to operate in an emergency. Overheated boilers can explode. Bacteria can thrive in limescale buildup, creating water quality issues that can present a health hazard to building occupants.

What does Limescale Look Like?

Limescale and other mineral deposits are not always evident to the naked eye. Often, they occur in closed systems within a building. However, facility and plant managers can watch for the following clues, which show a need to remove limescale.

  • Higher unexplained energy bills
  • Increased planned and unplanned downtime
  • Heat exchangers that perform below design
  • Corrosion problems across the facility
  • Signs of deposits within the system

Another way to identify limescale removal needs is to evaluate water quality and hardness. USGS defines water containing 61 to 120 mg/L of calcium carbonate as moderately hard, enough for limescale to flourish.

Removing and Preventing Limescale Buildup

The phrase “the best offense is a good defense” applies to more than just sports. It applies to limescale as well. Limescale, once formed, is not easily cleaned up or wiped away. It can be exceedingly difficult to remove.

Preventing and controlling limescale buildup in mechanical and plumbing equipment saves money, reduces maintenance, and prevents premature equipment failure. It’s easier to prevent limescale buildup than remove limescale once it starts. The best way to get ahead of limescale is to chart equipment performance daily, or at least weekly, to schedule and perform maintenance before limescale becomes a problem.

But standard cleaners won’t do the job, and toxic chemicals can be harsh and irritating to the technicians who use them. Salt-free products and water softeners can also do the trick, but they are also hard on equipment, high maintenance, and are very expensive.

Our ScaleBreak® liquid descaler is the limescale defense facility, and plant managers need. It dissolves mineral deposits quickly, safely, and sustainably.

The high-performance biodegradable industrial descaler rapidly dissolves calcium, lime, rust, and other deposits from water-cooled or heated equipment, including chiller tubes, flywheels, boiler tubes, brazed plate exchangers, and more. The scale dissolves into liquid suspension technicians can flush from the system.

ScaleBreak® liquid descaler is fortified with low foaming and penetrating agents and comes in various sizes to meet the needs of any size commercial or industrial facility.

Because equipment alloys can differ, we make ScaleBreak® safe to use on steel, iron, brass, copper, plastic, and rubber alloys. The blend cleans alloys thoroughly without damaging the base metals.

ScaleBreak® dissolves 2 pounds of scale per gallon of product. However, the overall volume and scale severity determine how many applications systems may require. We simplify these calculations with Goodway descaler calculators, which can help you calculate how much ScaleBreak® you would need and potential cost savings.

Next Steps

Limescale prevention and removal are necessary at every industrial and commercial facility. Click here to learn more about Goodway Industrial Descaling Systems and Solutions. Need help in determining which descaler is suitable for your needs? We’ve outlined which descaler will best meet your needs here. Don’t get caught off guard without a limescale prevention and/or removal plan.

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The Impact of an Unlevel AC in Crystal River, FL

An AC unit that sits outside your home or business in Crystal River, FL needs to be level to perform properly. This may require additional installation steps, such as putting a concrete pad in or other methods. If technicians don’t correctly install your AC and it is not level as a result, it can cause damage to components in the unit.

Draining Water

Proper water drainage through the drain pan is an issue if your air handler isn’t level also. Overflow of the drain pan can cause problems like rust and overflow causing damage to your home. An AC system inspection by trained professionals can help to make sure your AC system is level.

A Note on Compressors

The compressor plays a key role in heating and cooling inside the AC unit, which means that if something goes wrong with it, the AC unit will not perform well. If a compressor isn’t level, the oil inside the compressor will be uneven. This can cause damage due to improper lubrication. To avoid overheating the compressor, the AC unit should sit level.

Vibration Damage

An unlevel AC unit system can experience excess vibration and shaking, causing some serious problems. This might seem like a minor issue, but it can cause lasting damages that will likely cost you extra out-of-pocket expenses. Refrigerant lines and other components in the unit can loosen and wear out quicker with vibration if you leave your AC unit unlevel.

While it may be easy to overlook whether or not your AC is level, it’s worthwhile to consider this impact on how well it performs. If you live in or near Crystal River, FL, contact a trusted HVAC repair and maintenance company like Senica Air. Our technicians can diagnose major and minor problems with your AC unit and offer quality services to keep your HVAC performing as it should.

Image provided by iStock

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Lennox air conditioner troubleshooting

At HVAC.com, our writers create solutions that put you in control of your HVAC system. Our product reviews and recommendations are researched and backed by real buyers and industry experts, not dictated by our partners.

Is your AC not working properly? Give these Lennox air conditioner troubleshooting suggestions a try. You may be able to get it working on your own. You’ll save yourself the hassle and cost of hiring an HVAC technician to perform the fix.

Don’t want to deal with DIY? We can help.

Lennox AC is not blowing cold air

  • Check your thermostat. Set it to “cool” and “auto.” If you select “on” instead of “auto,” your fan will run even when it’s not actively cooling. 
  • Check your air filter. You should replace it every few months. If it’s dirty and dusty, it’s time for a new one. Follow these instructions to change your AC filter. You can order a new filter on Amazon or pick one up at a store like Lowe’s. 
  • Make sure your vents are clear of furniture and clutter. Open the louvers on the registers.  
  • If these Lennox AC troubleshooting tips don’t fix the issue, you may need to call a technician. Your evaporator coil, condenser, or refrigerant may require attention. 
man fixing lennox air conditioner

Lennox AC is making loud or unusual noises

  • If you’re hearing a rattling or clanking sound, it may be a DIY fix. First, turn off the power to your system.
  • Open the outside cover of your condenser. You may need a screwdriver to do this. 
  • Look inside and remove debris such as rocks, sticks, or leaves. Make sure to wear work gloves to protect your hands around the fan blades. 
  • Check screws, bolts, and other internal components. If you notice something is loose, tighten it. It may be causing the noise. 
  • Call a professional if you hear other noises, such as screeching, banging, or buzzing. It’s likely a more complex fix. 

Lennox AC is dripping water

  • Some moisture around your AC is normal. It makes condensation as it works. But if you notice a puddle or dripping water, you may need to perform some Lennox air conditioner troubleshooting. 
  • Check the drain pan under the indoor unit of your AC. It’s there to catch condensation. Make sure there isn’t anything else in it causing an overflow, such as mold or debris. 
  • If there’s a lot of water around the unit, turn the circuit breaker off. Use an old towel or a shop vac to soak up the water to avoid water damage. 
  • Check your air filter. Follow our guide if it needs a change. You can order a new air filter inexpensively online. 
  • Check your drain line. Your AC has a hose that directs condensation to the drain pan. Unscrew the hose and try to flush out clogs with warm water. Or use a shop vac to suck out any blockages. 
  • If these tips don’t do the trick, you’ll need to contact a local HVAC tech. 

Lennox air conditioner troubleshooting resources

Lennox has an air conditioner troubleshooting tool to help identify and fix AC issues. There’s also a product literature look-up where you can find the owner’s manual for your model. 

Both of these Lennox troubleshooting resources may help you identify the parts of your air conditioner. They can also help you determine whether your issue is a DIY fix or not.

If you’ve tried all our Lennox air conditioner troubleshooting tips and still can’t solve the problem, consider calling a professional. A technician can also troubleshoot for you if you’re not confident doing it yourself. 

Click below to connect with a top-rated local AC technician who can get your system up and running!

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Lennox air handler troubleshooting

At HVAC.com, our writers create solutions that put you in control of your HVAC system. Our product reviews and recommendations are researched and backed by real buyers and industry experts, not dictated by our partners.

A broken air handler is frustrating, no matter the time of year. In the warmer months, it prevents you from using your AC. And in the colder months, you’re without heat.

But a repair may be simpler than you think. With these Lennox air handler troubleshooting tips, you may be able to DIY a fix.

Don’t want to deal with DIY? Hire an HVAC pro now.

Lennox air handler fan is not running

Make sure your air handler has power. Check your electrical box to see if you’ve tripped a breaker. If you have, reset it. Ensure the switch for the air handler is turned on.

Next, set your thermostat to “on” instead of “auto.” It doesn’t matter if it’s on “heat” or “cool.” Feel your vents for any airflow.

If you still don’t feel air blowing, change the filter for your air handler and any other HVAC equipment in your home (furnace, heat pump, AC compressor, etc.) You should change these filters regularly to avoid airflow blockages. Make sure the replacement filters match the old ones for size and type.

Turn the power off to your air handler. Open it – you may have to unscrew the cover to do this. Take a peek inside and look for any dust or debris that may be jamming the fan. If you see an obvious blockage, remove it wearing work gloves to protect your hands from the fan blades.

Call an HVAC technician if none of these Lennox air handler troubleshooting suggestions bring your fan back to life. Your problem could be anything from a dead motor to a faulty thermostat. A pro will be able to pinpoint the problem for you.

lennox air handler repair

Lennox air handler fan is starting and stopping, or won’t stop

Check your thermostat. If you set it to “on” instead of “auto,” your fan will constantly blow, even when not actively heating or cooling. If you set it to “auto,” it will only blow during a heating or cooling cycle.

Next, check your air filters and replace them if they are dusty. A clogged filter may cause the heat exchanger to malfunction. You can pick up new filters inexpensively on Amazon or at a store like Walmart or Lowe’s.

If that doesn’t help, turn off the power and open your air handler. You may need to unscrew the cover. A dirty fan can also impact the heat exchanger. If yours needs cleaning, wipe it with a soft cloth (wear work gloves to protect your hands from the blades). You can also use canned air to dust the blades.

If these suggestions don’t help, you likely have a broken fan limit switch. Replacing this isn’t a DIY job. Contact a professional to fix the problem. 

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Air is not flowing properly through a Lennox air handler

If you feel that air is not flowing properly in your home, you may have an issue with your ducts. Do a cursory inspection of your ducts by removing your registers and looking in with a flashlight. If you see any blockages, remove them. If you see holes you can reach, repair them with aluminum foil tape or sealant.

If you haven’t had your ducts cleaned in several years, you may want to hire a duct cleaning service. The Environmental Protection Agency provides some good tips on determining whether you need this service. 

Make sure the registers in your home are unobstructed with open louvers. Remove furniture, decor, and other clutter that may be blocking them.

Replace all the air filters in your HVAC system. Ensure the new ones match the size and type of the existing ones.

Turn off the power to the system and open your air handler. You may need to unscrew the cover. The fan inside may be dusty or obstructed. Wear protective gloves and remove any visible obstructions from around the fan blades. Dust the components, including the fan blades, with a soft cloth or canned air.

If the airflow still isn’t right, call a professional to diagnose the issue.

Lennox air handler troubleshooting resources

Lennox has a troubleshooting tool on its site to help identify and fix issues with your system. There’s also a product literature lookup there, where you can find the owner’s manual for your model. These Lennox air handler troubleshooting resources can help you identify parts and determine when to call a pro for help. 

If you’ve tried our Lennox air handler troubleshooting recommendations and still have an issue, call a professional. An HVAC technician can also handle the troubleshooting for you if you’re not comfortable performing the tasks yourself.

Click below to connect with a top-rated local HVAC technician who can get your air handler back up and running!

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Rheem furnace troubleshooting

At HVAC.com, our writers create solutions that put you in control of your HVAC system. Our product reviews and recommendations are researched and backed by real buyers and industry experts, not dictated by our partners.

Rheem furnace not working? Wondering if you can fix it yourself or if you need to call an expert? You’ve come to the right place!

We’ve listed the most common issues below, along with corresponding Rheem furnace troubleshooting tips. Give our suggestions a try before calling a repairperson. You may save yourself the expense and hassle of a service visit.

Don’t want to deal with DIY? Hire an expert now.

Rheem furnace is not heating

Set your thermostat to “heat” and “auto.” If you set it to “on,” it will blow air constantly. If the furnace isn’t in a heating cycle, the air coming out of your vents may not feel warm.

Check the air filters throughout your home and in your furnace. You should change them every few months. If they get too dusty, they’ll prevent airflow throughout your HVAC system. You can purchase new filters on Amazon or at a nearby hardware store. Follow our furnace filter replacement guide for instructions on how to do this.

Check all the air vents in your home. The louvers should be open and free of obstructions like furniture, drapes, laundry piles, and other clutter. Blocked vents can also inhibit airflow.

If you can access your ductwork, examine it for holes and blockages. You can see some of your ducts by taking off the registers and looking inside with a flashlight. If debris has fallen in, remove it. If you see any leaks, repair them with UL181 Tape or sealant specified for ductwork repair. Consider hiring a duct cleaning company if you haven’t cleaned them recently.

If your furnace uses gas, check the gas valve inside. It’s a knob that likely has “on” and “off” labels. If the “on” and “off” labels are missing, you’ll know the valve is “off” if it is perpendicular to the gas piping. If it’s in line with the gas pipe, then it’s in the “on” position.

Check the pilot light if you have an older furnace (20+ years old). If it’s gone out, read your owner’s manual for instructions on how to re-light it.

Look at your burners and other components within the furnace. If they’re dirty, they may prevent ignition. With the furnace powered off, dust the inside with compressed air. You can also use a vacuum with a hand-held component with a soft bristle brush on the end. Burnt-on substances can be removed from your flame sensor and burners with an emory cloth.

If none of these Rheem furnace troubleshooting tips get your furnace heating again, call an expert.

rheem furnace troubleshooting fix

Rheem furnace is short cycling

Set your thermostat to “heat” and “auto.” Dust in and around the thermostat to ensure its sensors accurately read the temperature.

Check the air filters in the furnace and air returns. If excessively dusty, they may inhibit airflow and cause short cycling. Buy fresh filters on Amazon or at a nearby hardware store. Our furnace filter replacement guide has instructions to help you change yours.

Search your home for air leaks. Feel for drafts, especially near windows and doors. The Department of Energy has tips on how best to find air leaks. If you detect a leak, seal it with weatherstripping. Air leaks make it hard for the furnace to keep up, which may cause short cycling.

Check your air ducts for holes and blockages. Remove your registers and look in with a flashlight. Clean out any fallen debris inside and repair any holes with duct tape or sealant. If you can’t access all your ductwork, consider hiring a duct cleaning company for a thorough checkup.

Make sure your Rheem furnace flue is clear. It’s the metal tube that vents your furnace to the outside of your home. It may lead out through a wall or the roof. If there’s anything in the way, like snow or a bird’s nest, clear it away.

If these Rheem furnace troubleshooting suggestions don’t stop the short cycling, call an HVAC pro. They can get to the bottom of your issue.

Rheem furnace is running constantly

Set your thermostat to “heat” and “auto.” If you choose “on” instead of “auto,” your system will blow air constantly, even when it’s not in a heating cycle.

If that doesn’t solve your problem, dust in and around your thermostat with condensed air. Its sensors might be dusty and unable to register that it’s reached the set temperature.

Check the furnace filters and those in your air returns. If they are excessively dusty, they may block airflow and cause the furnace to strain. Purchase new filters on Amazon or at your local hardware store. Our furnace filter replacement guide has video instructions to help.

Search your home for air leaks. Feel for drafts near windows and doors. Seal them with weatherstripping or a draft stopper. If warm air is escaping, your furnace may have difficulty keeping up.

Also, check your air ducts for leaks or blockages. Remove your air registers and examine the inside with a flashlight. Clean out anything that’s fallen inside and fix any holes you can reach with UL181 Tape or sealant specified for ductwork repair. Consider hiring a duct cleaning company for a more thorough examination if you haven’t had your ducts cleaned in several years.

Finally, take a look at the limit switch in your furnace. It’s circular, with wires coming out on two sides. If this piece is damaged, it can cause your furnace to run constantly. If you’re an expert DIY-er, you may be able to replace it yourself following the instructions on our limit switch repair page. But in most cases, this is a job for a professional.

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Rheem furnace is making unusual noises

Rattling or clinking sounds may indicate an easy fix. Open your furnace cabinet and look inside for stray items that may have fallen in, especially screws or bolts that may have come loose. Check all fasteners and tighten them if needed.

Rheem furnace codes

Sometimes, your furnace may give you a clue about what’s wrong. Your Rheem furnace may have an LED display on the front, depending on its age. When it’s experiencing trouble, the furnace will display a code corresponding to the issue.

Below, we’ve listed some of the most common Rheem furnace codes and what they mean. For more information, refer to your Rheem furnace owner’s manual.

Rheem furnace code What it means Troubleshooting tips
0 Standby mode N/A – normal operation
cd Dehumidifier on N/A – normal operation
dF Defrost on N/A – normal operation
F Continuous fan on N/A – normal operation
H (flashing) Furnace calibrating N/A – normal operation
H Actively heating N/A – normal operation
d1 No shared data Furnace may not be communicating with thermostat.
10 One-hour lockout Call a professional. You may be able to get furnace running temporarily, but it requires attention.
11 Failed ignition Check flame sensor, gas valve, and gas supply.
12 Low flame Check flame sensor, gas valve, and gas supply.
13 Flame lost Check flame sensor, gas valve, and gas supply.
14 Unexpected flame Check your furnace for fire. Call a pro.
22 Main limit open Furnace is overheating. Check for system blockages and improper ventilation.
23 Heat assist limit open Furnace is overheating. Check for system blockages and improper ventilation.
26 Line and neutral reversed This is an electrical issue. Call an electrician.
33 Manual reset limit open Check furnace temperature. If it’s OK, reset limit switch (usually a red button on a circular device).
44 Low-pressure switch closed; inducer off Check the inducer. This prevents dangerous backdrafts in your home.
45 Low-pressure switch open; inducer on high Air intake is likely clogged.
46 Low-pressure switch open; inducer on low Air intake is likely clogged.
55 High-pressure switch closed; inducer off Check the inducer. This prevents dangerous backdrafts in your home.
57 High-pressure switch open Airflow is blocked somewhere in the system.
60 Blower fault; blower running Check blower for potential issues.
61 Blower fault; blower not running Check blower for potential issues.
66 Blower overspeed fault Check blower for potential issues.
68 No communication with blower motor Check blower for potential issues.
77 No communication with gas valve Check gas valve for potential issues.
78 Gas valve servo fault Check gas valve for potential issues.
82 Supply air temperature sensor fault Check air temperature sensor for potential issues.
93 Internal fault or control fault This is an issue with the control board. Call a pro for help.

Rheem furnace troubleshooting resources

Rheem’s website has a page that offers some help for furnace issues. There’s also a Homeowner Resource Center where you can look up warranty details and information about parts.

If our Rheen furnace troubleshooting tips aren’t enough to get your furnace back up and running, call an HVAC pro. They can identify the issue and fix it for you.

Fix my furnace now!

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Rheem AC troubleshooting

At HVAC.com, our writers create solutions that put you in control of your HVAC system. Our product reviews and recommendations are researched and backed by real buyers and industry experts, not dictated by our partners.

Got Rheem air conditioner problems? We’ve got answers. Check out our Rheem AC troubleshooting tips before you call a repairperson.

But if you’re uncomfortable performing any of these fixes, don’t worry! We can connect you with a local HVAC pro who can identify and solve your Rheem air conditioner problems. 

Fix my air conditioner now!

Rheem AC is not cooling

Set your thermostat to “cool” and “auto.” Lower the temperature several degrees and see if that makes a difference. Set the thermostat to “heat” and check for warm air coming from the vents. If your system doesn’t start heating, the problem is likely with your thermostat.

Dust inside and around your thermostat to ensure it can accurately read the indoor temperature. If it takes batteries, change them.

Check the air filters in your home and AC. You should change them regularly. If they are very dusty, they can block airflow, causing your HVAC system to malfunction. Change your filters every 60 to 90 days or sooner, if needed.

Look inside your ductwork for blockages or leaks. You can remove the registers and look inside with a flashlight. Remove any items that have fallen in or debris that’s gathered. Repair leaks with aluminum foil tape or sealant. Consider hiring a duct cleaning service for a full duct checkup. 

Check your compressor (large outdoor unit). Turn it off and remove the external cover – you may need to unscrew it with a screwdriver. Now go to the indoor unit to ensure the evaporator coil is free of dirt and debris. The evaporator coil is the part covered in U-shaped metal tubing. You can clean it with evaporator-safe coil cleaner if necessary. 

Inside the compressor, see if any components are frozen. This could signify a refrigerant leak or several other serious issues. If you notice anything frozen, call an HVAC tech for help.

If these Rheem AC troubleshooting tips don’t resolve your issue, it’s time to call a professional to look into the cause further.

fixing rheem air conditioner

Rheem AC compressor is not running

Make sure it’s turned on. Check that the switch it’s connected to is also on. Look at your electrical box. If you’ve tripped a breaker, reset it.

Set the thermostat to “cool” and “auto.” Ensure the temperature is set correctly (about 78℉ is ideal in the summer). Clean in and around the thermostat to clear dust away from the sensors. If your thermostat takes batteries, change them.

Turn off the power and open your compressor (large outdoor unit). You may need to unscrew it with a screwdriver. Clean out any debris that’s fallen inside, like sticks or leaves. Note whether components appear frozen. 

Try to start the Rheem AC again. If it still doesn’t start, stand by the compressor and listen for noises. If you hear buzzing, the issue may be your start capacitor. If you hear clicking, the problem may be the start relay. Neither of these is a DIY job, but knowing what’s wrong can help your HVAC technician address your Rheem air conditioner problems. 

Rheem AC smells bad

Different scents may indicate different Rheem air conditioner problems. For example:

  • A burning or electrical smell may mean an electrical component in your system is malfunctioning. Call a professional for help.
  • A moldy or musty smell can mean there’s mold growing somewhere in your system. Read our guide for cleaning up mold in your home. You may consider hiring an HVAC contractor or duct cleaning company, especially if you live in a humid area. 
  • A fishy or rotten egg smell may suggest there’s a dead animal trapped somewhere – likely in your ducts or your condenser. If you can’t find and remove the animal on your own, an HVAC technician can help.
  • A skunky or gassy smell can signify a gas leak in your system. Turn it off immediately, open your windows, and call a professional. 
  • A sweet chemical smell likely means your refrigerant is leaking. Turn your HVAC system off, open windows for ventilation, and call an expert to find and repair the leak. 

Rheem AC is making loud noises

It may be a DIY fix if you hear a rattling or clinking sound. Turn off the power and remove the cover from your compressor (you might need a screwdriver to do this). Clear any debris inside, such as sticks, leaves, or grass.

Look for loose screws that may have fallen inside, especially around the blower motor (wheel-like piece). Check and tighten any screws and bolts to ensure they’re not the source of the noise. Replace the cover and see if this stopped the noise.

Check your ducts for leaks or blockages if you hear hissing or whistling. Remove your registers and look in with a flashlight. Remove visible items that have fallen in and repair holes with duct tape. Call a duct maintenance company for service if you can’t access all your ductwork.

Screeching, banging, or other noises may indicate a more serious Rheem air conditioner problem. Call an expert for assistance. 

Book an appointment for repair now.

Rheem AC is leaking water

Your AC makes some condensation. A drain pan below the evaporator coil (large indoor unit) collects the condensation. But, if you see a large puddle or dripping water, you may have a problem.

First, turn off the power to the air conditioner at your electrical box. Examine the drain pan. Soak up the excess water with an old towel and clean out any debris or mold that may be causing it to overflow.

Next, check the drain line (clear tubing) leading to the drain pan. You can pull this off and clean it if there are visible blockages. You can either use a shop vac to suck out the obstruction or flush it out with warm water. Return the drain line once it’s clean. 

Rheem AC troubleshooting resources

Rheem has a page on its website that gives some information on addressing Rheem air conditioner problems. It also has a Homeowner Resource Center to look up warranty and parts details. 

If our Rheen AC troubleshooting tips and Rheem resources don’t get your AC back to work, click below to connect with an HVAC technician who can assist. 

Connect with a local HVAC professional now.

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Rheem heat pump troubleshooting

At HVAC.com, our writers create solutions that put you in control of your HVAC system. Our product reviews and recommendations are researched and backed by real buyers and industry experts, not dictated by our partners.

Heat pump acting up? Before you call a repair person, check out our Rheem heat pump troubleshooting tips. You may be able to save yourself the expense and hassle of a service visit.

But if you’d rather leave the troubleshooting to the pros, click below to connect with a local HVAC technician who can get your heat pump working ASAP. 

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Rheem heat pump is not running

First, check the thermostat. Set it to “heat” if you want the heat on. Set it to “cool” if you want the AC on. Set it to “auto” instead of “on” or “off.” Adjust the temperature setting to see if that makes it kick on.

Try the opposite of what you want – if you need AC, set the thermostat to “heat” and vice versa. If your system will deliver one and not the other, the issue is likely the reversing valve. You’ll need to call an HVAC technician to replace it.

Dust in and around the thermostat with compressed air. The thermostat’s sensors may be dirty, preventing it from reading the temperature correctly. 

Make sure your Rheem heat pump has power. Check that its reset button isn’t tripped, and reset it if needed. The reset button is generally red with two wires protruding from it (but that may differ on your model). Refer to your user’s manual for help locating it. You may need to remove your heat pump’s cover to access it. 

If your heat pump connects to a power switch, make sure the switch is on. Also, check your electrical box for a tripped circuit breaker. If you find one, reset it.

Finally, listen for sounds coming from your heat pump. If you hear a clicking when the heat pump should turn on, your start capacitor is the issue. Call an expert for repair – it’s not a DIY job.

Rheem heat pump is leaking

Heat pumps collect condensation, so seeing water in or near your heat pump doesn’t automatically mean something’s wrong. However, if you see water dripping or a puddle around the unit, you should check it out.

Heat pumps typically sit on a drain pan intended to collect water. Your drain pan may be overflowing if it’s clogged with mold or debris. Clean it out if necessary and soak up excess water with an old towel or a shop vac. Check for cracks. If you notice any damage, you’ll need to replace the part. Call a local Rheem dealer for help. 

Examine the condensate pan. It’s a small pan with raised edges inside your heat pump. Clean it out if it’s full of mold or debris. Check for cracks. If you notice any, you’ll need to replace the pan. Call your local dealer for help.

Find the tubing used to drain water within your heat pump. It’s likely PVC or a plastic hose. If you’re able to, take it apart and examine for clogs or cracks. If it’s clogged, suck out blockages with your shop vac or flush them out with your garden hose.

While you’re checking the inside of your heat pump, take a look at the evaporator coil. It’s a piece with U-shaped metal tubing on the ends. If the evaporator coil looks frozen, you may have a refrigerant leak. Call a professional to locate and repair the leak.

If the evaporator coil appears dirty, it could be malfunctioning, causing water to drip. Turn off the heat pump and clean it with coil cleaner and a soft cloth

Call an HVAC expert for service if these Rheem heat pump troubleshooting suggestions don’t do the trick.

heat pumps outside

Rheem heat pump is short cycling

Set your thermostat to “auto” instead of “on.” If you’re using the AC, set the temperature down a few degrees. If you’re using the heat, set the temperature up a few degrees to see if that makes a difference.

Dust in and around your thermostat with compressed air. If the sensors are dirty, it may be short cycling because your thermostat can’t read the indoor temperature accurately. 

Check the air filters in your heat pump and indoor air registers. You should change them regularly. If they’re full of dust, they inhibit airflow, which may cause short cycling. Buy new filters and replace yours if necessary. 

Feel around your home for drafts that may indicate air leaks. The Environmental Protection Agency has a guide with best practices. If you find any leaks, especially around windows and doors, seal them with weatherstripping. Air leaks may cause your HVAC system’s cycles to become irregular. 

Check your ductwork for blockages or leaks. You can see some of your ductwork by removing your registers and looking in with a flashlight. If you see any items that have fallen in, remove them. If you see any holes, repair them with duct tape or sealant. If you haven’t had a full checkup of your ductwork recently, consider hiring a duct cleaning company. 

Open the louvers on your registers. Ensure they’re clear of furniture, decor, and household clutter. Any kind of airflow blockage can lead to short cycling.

If these Rheem heat pump troubleshooting recommendations don’t stop the short cycling, call a local HVAC expert to give your system a full evaluation.

Rheem heat pump troubleshooting resources

Rheem has a section on its website with information to help fix your HVAC equipment. There’s also a Homeowner Resource Center with materials on warranties and parts. 

If these Rheem heat pump troubleshooting tips don’t get your system back to work, click below to connect with an HVAC technician who can help. 

Connect me with a local HVAC professional.

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Rheem air handler troubleshooting

At HVAC.com, our writers create solutions that put you in control of your HVAC system. Our product reviews and recommendations are researched and backed by real buyers and industry experts, not dictated by our partners.

Air handler not working right? We’ve got Rheem air handler troubleshooting tips to address some of the most common issues. Give these suggestions a try before calling a repairperson unnecessarily.

Or, if you prefer to leave the troubleshooting to the pros, click below to connect with an HVAC technician who can quickly get your air handler back to work.

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Rheem air handler has weak airflow

First, check the filters throughout your HVAC system. You should change them regularly. If they get overwhelmed with dust, they’ll weaken airflow. If your filters need a refresh, order new ones on Amazon or pick them up at a nearby hardware store.

Next, take a look at your ductwork. You can see a partial view of your ducts by removing the registers and looking in with a flashlight. If you spot any blockages, remove them. If you see any holes, repair them with aluminum foil tape or sealant. Consider hiring a duct cleaning company to give your ductwork a full checkup.

Finally, check your AC compressor or heat pump. Remove the cabinet cover (you may need to unscrew it with a screwdriver). Examine your evaporator coil. It’s the part with U-shaped metal tubing at the ends. If it’s frozen, it may be causing diminished airflow. Call an HVAC technician. You may have a refrigerant leak, which isn’t a DIY fix.

If these Rheem air handler troubleshooting tips don’t work, call a professional for help. There may be an issue with your blower motor or circuitry.

Rheem air handler blower motor isn’t working

First, make sure your air handler has power. If it’s connected to a switch, check that it’s on. Inspect your electrical box for a tripped circuit breaker. If you find one, reset it.

Set your thermostat to “on” instead of “off” or “auto.” While “auto” is generally the preferred setting, “on” should make your air handler blow regardless of the temperature setting.

Check the air filters throughout your HVAC system, especially at your air returns. You should change them regularly. If they’re clogged, they may inhibit airflow and cause different elements of your system to malfunction. You can replace your filters with new ones from Amazon or a local hardware store.

Examine your ductwork. Your air handler may be blowing, but the air isn’t coming through the vents because of leaks or blockages. Open your registers and look in with a flashlight. If you see debris, clean it out. If you see holes or damaged joints, repair them with aluminum foil tape or sealant.

Finally, open the cabinet and check the blower motor. Clean out any dust or blockages with canned air or a soft cloth. If you notice the blower motor humming with its lights turned on, the issue is likely with the capacitor. Call an HVAC technician for a repair.

If these Rheem air handler troubleshooting tips don’t get your system back to work, an HVAC expert can determine what’s going on.

guy fixing rheem air handler

Rheem air handler is leaking

Water plus electricity is dangerous, so immediately turn off your air handler at your electrical box. Clean up the excess water with an old towel or a shop vac immediately to avoid damage to your home.

Most air handlers sit on a drain pan to collect condensation. Check the drain pan for mold and debris that may be causing it to overflow. Clean it out with an old towel or shop vac. If it’s cracked or broken, you’ll need to replace it to avoid more leakage.

Your air handler has a condensate drain tube that may clog, causing leaks. Remove the tube and suck out any blockages with a shop vac. Use your garden hose to flush out the tube if you don’t have one.

Check the air filters throughout your HVAC system, especially at your air returns. You should replace them every few months. If yours are full of dust, they may prohibit air from flowing over your air hander’s evaporator coils. This, in turn, may cause them to freeze. When they melt, it might appear that water is leaking.

Similarly, low refrigerant levels or a refrigerant leak may cause your coils to freeze. An HVAC technician can locate and repair a leak and replace your refrigerant.

Rheem air handler troubleshooting resources

There’s a section on Rheem’s website with information to help fix your HVAC equipment. The company also has a Homeowner Resource Center with materials on warranties and parts for its HVAC products.

If these Rheem air handler troubleshooting tips don’t get your system up and running, click below to connect with an HVAC technician who can help.

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Rheem thermostat troubleshooting 

At HVAC.com, our writers create solutions that put you in control of your HVAC system. Our product reviews and recommendations are researched and backed by real buyers and industry experts, not dictated by our partners.

Need help fixing your thermostat? We’ve got Rheem thermostat troubleshooting tips to help.

If you’re intimidated by any of these steps, no problem! Click below to connect with a local HVAC technician who can handle the troubleshooting for you.

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Rheem thermostat isn’t turning on

If your thermostat takes batteries, change them.

Check your electrical box if your thermostat connects to your electrical wiring. If you have a tripped circuit breaker, reset it.

Make sure all other elements of your HVAC system are turned on and functioning. If your furnace, AC compressor, or heat pump is experiencing a problem, you may notice an LED error code or blinking lights. Check your user’s manuals for more information on reading Rheem error codes. A system malfunction may cause your thermostat to stop working.

Call an HVAC professional if these Rheem thermostat troubleshooting suggestions don’t fix your problem. There may be an issue with the wiring to your thermostat.

Heat or AC is not responding to Rheem thermostat settings

First, try the opposite of what you want. For example, if you want the AC on, change the thermostat to “heat.” If your system turns on one and not the other, you can more easily pinpoint the issue. For example, if the AC works, it may be your furnace and vice versa. Or, if you have a heat pump, it’s likely your reverse valve.

If your thermostat takes batteries, change them. If it’s connected to your electrical system, check your electrical box to ensure you haven’t tripped a circuit breaker. If you have, reset it.

Dust in and around your thermostat with canned air. If its sensors are dirty and dusty, they may not read the temperature accurately. 

Check the air filters throughout your HVAC system and change them as necessary. They may inhibit the system from running properly if they’re overwhelmed with dust. You can pick up replacement filters on Amazon or a local hardware store. 

If these tips don’t help, call an HVAC professional. There may be an issue with the wiring between your thermostat and the rest of your HVAC system.

guy doing rheem thermostat troubleshooting

Rheem thermostat temperature does not match room temperature

If your thermostat takes batteries, change them. If it’s connected to your electrical system, check your electrical box for a tripped circuit breaker. If you find one, reset it.

Clean your thermostat by blowing compressed air in and around it. If its sensors are blocked, it may not be reading the temperature correctly. 

Check the filters throughout your HVAC system. You should change them regularly. If dust clogs them, your system may have trouble pushing air out to meet the desired temperature. You can change your air filters with new ones from Amazon or a local hardware store.

The same may be true if your ductwork is clogged or leaking. Remove your registers and look in with a flashlight to check your ducts. If you see visible blockages, remove them. If you see holes, repair them with duct tape or sealant. You may also consider hiring a duct cleaning company to give your ductwork a full examination. 

Check your home for air leaks. The Environmental Protection Agency has guidelines on how to do this. Paying special attention to the areas near windows and doors, feel for drafts. Seal with weatherstripping as needed. If the cold or warm air is escaping through leaks, your system will have difficulty keeping up. 

If none of these Rheem thermostat troubleshooting suggestions help, call a pro. It’s likely your problem is more serious than a DIY fix. 

Rheem thermostat troubleshooting resources

Rheem has a section on its website with information on fixing your HVAC equipment. It also features a Homeowner Resource Center with warranties and parts replacement details. 

If these Rheem thermostat troubleshooting tips don’t get your HVAC system back to work, click below to connect with a pro who can help.

Connect me with a local HVAC technician 🧑‍🔧

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